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June 2008 Blog Posts

Vista 64 Bit - Wow

I have been running Vista 32 bit for a year and a half now and have come to love it. Performance wasn't astounding, but if you disabled the search indexing and automatic file system backups it had a fairly low foot print. I have been limited to 2.5gigs of usable ram though, 1 gig went straight to video memory, and another .5 went to other devices such as the physics card. This week is an off week in the summer curriculum at the University so I took the free weekend as on opportunity to finally man up...

posted @ Wednesday, June 25, 2008 8:11 PM | Feedback (2) |

Performance – Security – Server.Transfer()

I stumbled across "Performance Gain – Security Risk" which provides a very good and simple example of why one should be careful when using Server.Transfer(). Transfer has a benefit over Redirect as it doesn't have the same performance cost by going through the ASP.NET pipeline, but that has the cost of not going through authorization. The takeaway, be careful, and don't transfer into secure areas of your site

posted @ Friday, June 13, 2008 8:32 PM | Feedback (11) |

LINQ, SQLMetal, MVC, CS1579

LINQ, SQLMetal, and MVC seem to complement each other extremely well. Together, the three lead to some very elegant and fast development. SQLMetal generates the database context for LINQ, which so happens to work as a great data layer/Model. The data context, complements of SQLMetal, can be place into the Model tier of MVC for convenient access by the Controllers. Using LINQ the data can be easily sent to the Views through the View Data. Very elegant. Getting going using MVC and SQLMetal was fairly straight forward. The key was running the following from Visual Studio Command...

posted @ Saturday, June 7, 2008 11:06 PM | Feedback (5) | Filed Under [ Web Programming ]

FORTRAN 90

It's time for me to focus a lot of my energy to learning FORTRAN for high performance coding. My strongest language is by far C#, so this should be a very interesting experience to say the least. I will try and document the transition from such a modern language to FORTRAN in case someone else finds themselves going through a similar language transition. Simply getting started is quite an awakening; it's obvious from a few google searches that the community base is much smaller and information harder to come by. Just finding a compiler is not so trivial....

posted @ Friday, June 6, 2008 9:41 PM | Feedback (0) | Filed Under [ Fortran 90 ]

Property Owner is not available for Database

  TITLE: Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio ------------------------------ Cannot show requested dialog. ------------------------------ ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Cannot show requested dialog. (SqlMgmt) ------------------------------ Property Owner is not available for Database '[dbname]'. This property may not exist for this object, or may not be retrievable due to insufficient access rights. (Microsoft.SqlServer.Smo) For help, click: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink?ProdName=Microsoft+SQL+Server&ProdVer=9.00.3042.00&EvtSrc=Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.ExceptionTemplates.PropertyCannotBeRetrievedExceptionText&EvtID=Owner&LinkId=20476 ------------------------------ BUTTONS: OK ------------------------------     To fix simply change the owner, for example: use dbname exec sp_changedbowner 'sa'        

posted @ Friday, June 6, 2008 1:42 PM | Feedback (1) | Filed Under [ Web Programming ]

Seam Carving for Resizing using SEAMonster

I first saw seam carving, http://www.seamcarving.com/, about a year ago when it was so hot that just downloading the white paper was a challenge (see post). I immediately dug for code with no luck. A few months later I noted some python code, thought of translating that but the time just wasn't available. I did another check for seam carving code lately and found SEAMonster. The code runs well as is, though the algorithm was a bit slower than I had hoped. Resizing a 400x300 jpg image on my core2 laptop took a few seconds....

posted @ Thursday, June 5, 2008 9:06 PM | Feedback (1) | Filed Under [ Web Programming ]

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